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Video Learning Library

These short videos offer a provocation to our field.  We hope they will inspire you, provide a starting point for advocacy, and support your professional development.

Continuity of Care – Reflections from the Field

Continuity of Care – Reflections from the Field

Continuity of care is the third key to providing the deep connections that infants and toddlers need for quality child care. Programs that incorporate the concept of continuity of care keep primary infant/toddler care teachers and children together throughout the three years of infancy period., or for the time during that period of the child’s enrollment in care. Learn more now. Special thanks to J. Ronald Lally, Ed.D. and Peter L. Mangione, Ph.D. for their valuable insight and contributions.
The Raising of America – Are We Crazy About Our Kids?

The Raising of America – Are We Crazy About Our Kids?

Chris Engel says this is a must-watch. Are We Crazy About Our Kids? (32 minutes) is one of the supporting episodes to the forthcoming documentary series, The Raising of America: Early Childhood and the Future of Our Nation, now in production (more at www.RaisingofAmerica.org). Science has demonstrated that a child's experiences during the earliest years are vital to building the foundation for life-long individual success -- in school and in life. Now economists are studying the costs and benefits of high quality early care and preschool. And they're worried. Not because we're spending too much but because we're spending too little where it matters most. Studies by Federal Reserve economist Arthur Rolnick, Nobel laureate James Heckman and others conclude that high quality early care and pre-school yield huge individual - and public -- benefits.
Too Small to Fail

Too Small to Fail

On June 14th, Hillary Clinton announced a new partnership with Too Small to Fail and asks Americans to join the movement -- for the future of our kids, and our country. www.toosmall.org
Empowering Children’s Voices

Empowering Children’s Voices

This video was created by the Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning as part of their Infant Toddler Conference on Language and Literacy.
Change the First Five Years and You Change Everything

Change the First Five Years and You Change Everything

Early education programs do not supplant parents, but support them as their childs first and most important teacher. The sad reality is that many low-income parents grew up in poverty and may not have the tools to support their childs education. Evidence-based programs coach low-income parents on how to best support their childs education at school and at home starting before the child is born. Only by supporting the family can we narrow the achievement gap and break the cycle of poverty. http://www.ounceofprevention.org
New Video Teaches Parents How to Build a Foundation for Reading Success With Their Children

New Video Teaches Parents How to Build a Foundation for Reading Success With Their Children

The message has been clear from countless sources: parents need to read to their children. But what parents really need to know is how they read makes all the difference in the development of their children’s vocabulary, comprehension and critical thinking skills. Research has shown that by reading with their children – not to them – parents greatly increase children’s language and literacy, developing the foundation they need to enter kindergarten as strong, confident learners on a path to grade level reading and so much more - for a lifetime. To help parents learn key things to do at story time, the Rollins Center for Language & Learning at the Atlanta Speech School has partnered with the Junior League of Atlanta to produce the complimentary video READ. In just five minutes, parents learn what they can do to make books come alive for their children and increase their learning: Repeat Books, Engage and Enjoy, Ask Questions, and Do More. A two-page coaching sheet recaps the four steps, and provides more information on the research that is the basis for the READ strategy. This video is narrated by Justin Cook, a 2010 graduate of the Atlanta Speech School’s Wardlaw School, and is posted on the school’s website, atlantaspeechschool.org.

Toxic Stress Derails Healthy Development

Toxic Stress Derails Healthy Development

Learning how to cope with adversity is an important part of healthy development. While moderate, short-lived stress responses in the body can promote growth, toxic stress is the strong, unrelieved activation of the body's stress management system in the absence of protective adult support. Without caring adults to buffer children, the unrelenting stress caused by extreme poverty, neglect, abuse, or severe maternal depression can weaken the architecture of the developing brain, with long-term consequences for learning, behavior, and both physical and mental health. This video is part three of a three-part series titled "Three Core Concepts in Early Development" from the Center and the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. The series depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics now give us a much better understanding of how early experiences are built into our bodies and brains, for better or for worse. Healthy development in the early years provides the building blocks for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, lifelong health, strong communities, and successful parenting of the next generation. For more information, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu
Serve & Return Interaction Shapes Brain Circuitry

Serve & Return Interaction Shapes Brain Circuitry

One of the most essential experiences in shaping the architecture of the developing brain is "serve and return" interaction between children and significant adults in their lives. Young children naturally reach out for interaction through babbling, facial expressions, and gestures, and adults respond with the same kind of vocalizing and gesturing back at them. This back-and-forth process is fundamental to the wiring of the brain, especially in the earliest years. This video is part two of a three-part series titled "Three Core Concepts in Early Development" from the Center and the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. The series depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics now give us a much better understanding of how early experiences are built into our bodies and brains, for better or for worse. Healthy development in the early years provides the building blocks for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, lifelong health, strong communities, and successful parenting of the next generation. For more information, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu
Experiences Build Brain Architecture

Experiences Build Brain Architecture

The basic architecture of the brain is constructed through a process that begins early in life and continues into adulthood. Simpler circuits come first and more complex brain circuits build on them later. Genes provide the basic blueprint, but experiences influence how or whether genes are expressed. Together, they shape the quality of brain architecture and establish either a sturdy or a fragile foundation for all of the learning, health, and behavior that follow. Plasticity, or the ability for the brain to reorganize and adapt, is greatest in the first years of life and decreases with age. This video is part one of a three-part series titled "Three Core Concepts in Early Development" from the Center and the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. The series depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics now give us a much better understanding of how early experiences are built into our bodies and brains, for better or for worse. Healthy development in the early years provides the building blocks for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, lifelong health, strong communities, and successful parenting of the next generation. For more information, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu
Brain Hero

Brain Hero

In 2009, the Center on the Developing Child launched a collaboration with the Interactive Media Division of the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California (USC) to develop and test new ways of communicating the science of early childhood development using interactive media. The "Brain Hero" video, depicting how actions by a range of people in the family and community impact child development, is the first product of this collaboration. This 3-minute video adapts the visual sensibility of interactive game models to a video format. Based loosely on such games as "Guitar Hero," "SimCity," and "The Game of Life," the video portrays how actions taken by parents, teachers, policymakers, and others can affect life outcomes for both the child and the surrounding community. This collaboration, now between the Harvard Center and USC's newly launched Creative Media & Behavioral Health Center will continue joint work on the creation and dissemination of innovative storytelling products designed to inform the public discourse around policies and practices that support healthy brain development during childhood. For more information, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu

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SCPITC Network
Kerrie L. Schnake, Director
USC CDRC SC PITC Network
1530 Wheat Street
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Tel: (803) 777-0092
Email: SCPITC@mailbox.sc.edu